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A view of the Loch Ness Monster, near Inverness, Scotland, April 19, 1934. The photograph, one of two pictures known as the 'surgeon's photographs,' was allegedly taken by Colonel Robert Kenneth Wilson, though it was later exposed as a hoax by one of the participants, Chris Spurling, who, on his deathbed, revealed that the pictures were staged by himself, Marmaduke and Ian Wetherell, and Wilson. References to a monster in Loch Ness date back to St. Columba's biography in 565 AD. More than 1,000 people claim to have seen 'Nessie' and the area is, consequently, a popular tourist attraction. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

On May 2, 1933 the Loch Ness Monster became “known” to the public. A newspaper in Inverness, Scotland reported on a mystery sighting in the largest of the Scottish lochs (it’s a big lake).

While the legend dates back long before that Inverness Courier newspaper article appeared, it was that piece that made Nessie a part of our cultural lexicon.

There have been lots of claims about “finding” the real monster – or at least disproving its existence in the first place. Most notably in 1994 a study said the infamous photo everyone now recognizes, was a fake. But that still hasn’t eliminated the mystery of the big monster living in the Scottish lake.

What do you think? Is Nessie real? Check out all the photos below and let us know what YOU think!

 

PHOTO GALLERY: The Loch Ness Monster